IOM Today

An intergovernmental organization established in 1951, IOM is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society.

  • 162 Member States and 9 State Observers
  • 401 offices with more than 9,000 staff
  • 95% of staff members based in the Field, with a ratio of 1:8 international versus national staff
  • Key areas of migration management include migration and development, facilitating migration, regulating migration and forced migration

Login Form

Promoting Stability, Well-being and Harmony for Myanmar Muslim and Host Communities in Thailand

Funded by the European Delegation to Thailand and co-financed by the US Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM), the project is an expansion and continuation of two previously projects successfully implemented by IOM.

1)      “Livelihoods and Community Solutions” (LCS) funded by the EU and  implemented from 2013 to 2015 to promote livelihood opportunities and the socio-economic self-reliance of marginalised Myanmar Muslim minority groups and vulnerable Thais in 8 communities in Mae Sot, Tak Province.

2)      “Reducing the Vulnerabilities of Myanmar Muslims through Community Outreach and Increasing Their Access to Social and Health Services” funded by the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) from 2010 to 2014   to address the vulnerabilities of marginalised Muslim communities in Ranong, and Tak Provinces with a broader focus on health services, environmental health and livelihoods.

 

Read more: Promoting Stability, Well-being and Harmony for Myanmar Muslim and Host Communities in Thailand

Livelihoods and Community: Sustainable Solutions for the Forgotten Rohingyas and Host Communities in Mae Sot 

The Livelihoods and Community Solutions (LCS) project, implemented from January 2013 to July 2015, aimed to promote livelihood opportunities and the socio-economic self-reliance of marginalised Myanmar Muslims and vulnerable Thais in targeted communities in Mae Sot, Tak province. The project also aimed to strengthen and to facilitate relationships, understanding and cooperation between marginalised Myanmar Muslims, Thais who lack access to economic opportunities in local communities, neighbouring Thai communities, NGOs, CBOs, and local government authorities. The LCS Project ran parallel to the DIBP-funded project “Reducing the vulnerabilities of Myanmar Muslims through Community Outreach and increasing their Access to Social and Health Services” which was implemented from 2010 to 2014 with a broader focus on health services, environmental health and livelihoods.

Read more: LIVELIHOODS AND COMMUNITY: SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR THE FORGOTTEN ROHINGYAS AND HOST COMMUNITIES...

Andaman Sea Crisis: Humanitarian Assistance to Stranded Migrants in Indonesia and Thailand

Shelter, along with food and clothing are considered to be the three absolute minimum resources necessary for any person’s long-term physical well-being. For migrants fleeing from conflict or disasters, shelter usually comes in the form of rudimentary tents hastily built to accommodate large numbers of people. While basic enough to provide enough protection from the elements, such structures are meant to be temporary and deteriorate over time due to wear and tear. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the European Commission's Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO) strongly believe that proper shelter is an essential need that migrants deserve.

Read more: Andaman Sea Crisis: Humanitarian Assistance to Stranded Migrants in Indonesia and Thailand

Poverty Reduction through Skills Development for Safe and Regular Migration in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam

The 'Poverty Reduction through Skills Development for Safe and Regular Migration in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam' Project aims to strengthen the linkages between skills development, successful migration outcomes and poverty reduction for female and male migrants.

While the potential of migration to positively impact upon socio-economic conditions in both countries of origin and destination is well-documented, such positive outcomes of migration on poverty reduction and socio-economic development in countries of origin have not generally been realized to the extent possible.

Read more: Poverty Reduction through Skills Development for Safe and Regular Migration in CLMTV

Assessing Potential Changes in the Migration Patterns of Lao PDR Migrants and Their Impacts on Thailand and Lao PDR

Laotians are among the largest of migrant communities in Thailand. Geographical proximity and cultural/linguistic similarities contribute to facilitating their integration in the host communities; however, Laotian migrants remain one of the most poorly understood groups in Thailand. Particularly, there is little understanding about the linkages between migration patterns and socio-economic development in Lao PDR, and whether recent developments in both countries are likely to shape migration patterns.

IOM is therefore implementing a comprehensive research study, in partnership with the Asian Research Center for Migration of Chulalongkorn University, funded by the Government of Switzerland through the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), to research the situations of Lao migrants in Thailand and the effects of migration on poverty reduction in Lao PDR. In this context, poverty reduction is conceived as the combined effects of investments, consumption, skills and human capital returns of migration.

Read more: Assessing Potential Changes in the Migration Patterns of Lao PDR Migrants and Their Impacts on...